Is it Can Cameron bring us full employment? And do we want to?

Is it Can Cameron bring us full employment? And do we want to?
'Two million jobs have been created since 2010 - but there will be no time to rest until we reach our goal,' David Cameron wrote in a Telegraph paper two weeks before the election: 'Two million more jobs; or full employment in the UK. 'It was a bold statement. As you can imagine, considering the 1.84 million unemployment in the winter quarter, that the aim of the new job was a mistake for who ever prepared the Prime Minister's draft. Either way, it touched a bit more of the time and smoke of the war. But now the air is open to scrutiny, because it covers all important topics (except one in Scotland - it is fraught with the danger that, like the Scottish game, it is totally unnecessary) of the coming phase of national politics: desire, equality, spending, migration and EU membership.

Is it Is it full employment, and is it a realistic goal? When George Osborne announced that in April 2014, I called him a "cheek" - even though his speech was followed by a sharp decline in the unemployment rate. Full employment does not mean 'everyone at work'; more like 'everyone in a full or part-time job who wants to have and not rest between jobs'. Back in July 1955, it meant an unemployment rate of just 1 percent, or 216,000 workers.

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